Standardese - a (work-in-progress) nextgen Doxygen

Documentation is essential. Without knowing what certain functions/classes/… do, it is very difficult to use any code properly.

Tools can help to provide a documentation. They can extract information from the source code and combine it with manually written information to generate documentation in a human readable output format.

There is a problem though: The current tools for C++ documentation aren’t that great. This post explains why and provides a (work-in-progress) solution.

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Author's profile picture Jonathan

How I have beaten Boost.Pool #4: About abstractions and algorithms

The last posts showed low-level techniques like ensuring inlining or removing branches.

But those techniques alone were not sufficient.

In this series, I’ll explain my changes and share some lessons about optimization I’ve learned in the process of beating Boost.Pool. The final post shows how to apply those techniques when designing your abstractions and the importance of smart algorithms.

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Author's profile picture Jonathan

How I have beaten Boost.Pool #3: Branches are bad

Branches and conditional jumps are essential for every program, you cannot write anything but the most trivial code without them. Yet they sometimes have a certain overhead and can lead to problems in performance critical code paths.

It is often faster if they weren’t there. But how can you do that?

In this series, I’ll explain my changes and share some lessons about optimization I’ve learned in the process of beating Boost.Pool. This time its all about branches and a more detailed information about the detail::small_free_memory_list.

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Author's profile picture Jonathan

(Awesome?) Allocator Additions - Thoughts regarding allocator proposals

The C++ Standards Committee Papers of the post-Jacksonville mailing were recently published. There are few quite interesting ones that deal with the STL’s allocator model: P0177R1 - Cleaning up allocator_traits, P0178R0 - Allocators and swap(actually from February) and P0310R0 - Splitting node and array allocation in allocators.

In this post, I’d like to discuss those with you and explain why I really hope some of them they will accepted. The first parts are also a follow-up to AllocatorAwareContainer: Introduction and pitfalls of propagate_on_container_XXX defaults.

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Author's profile picture Jonathan

How I have beaten Boost.Pool #2: Inlining is key

Calling a function has a certain overhead. Registers must be saved, a new stack frame pushed,… For small functions this overhead is more than the actual implementation of the function!

For those, it is much better if the compiler would copy-paste the implementation directly into the call site. This is what inlining does.

Luckily, the compiler is usually able to do this optimization. Or can it?

In this series, I’ll explain my changes and share some lessons about optimization I’ve learned in the process of beating Boost.Pool. This time I’m going to cover inlining. I’m going to share some of guidelines I’ve learned and also going to give you a look into some of memory`s internal code and design.

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Author's profile picture Jonathan

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